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Interesting News Article Re: Potential Cure from UK


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#1 grinleyboy

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 04:33 AM

Breakthrough on leukaemia

by JAMES CHAPMAN, Daily Mail

A simple injection to cure leukaemia could be produced within five years after a remarkable breakthrough by a British research team.

They believe they have found a way to trigger the body's immune system to beat a disease which kills 4,000 people a year in this country. The same techniques may eventually be advanced to treat other cancers, such as breast and lung, they say.

The breakthrough follows six years of research, funded by the Leukaemia Research Fund, at London's Hammersmith Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine.

It involves two strands, firstly to 'label' the cancerous cells, and secondly to mass-produce immune cells outside the body which can then be injected to search and destroy the malignant ones. In the future, the researchers hope to use the technique to 'wake up' a patient's own immune system to destroy malignant cells without using donor cells.

Dr Hans Stauss, a tumour immunologist at Imperial, said: 'The possibilities for new treatments are enormous.' The first trial of the injection is about to begin on ten patients.

The 'labelling' was achieved by identifying a single gene which is over-active in leukaemia cells. It is referred to as WT-1. For the second strand, the researchers took white blood cells from healthy donors and isolated the few that mounted the fiercest response against tumour cells in the laboratory.

By cloning them, they were able to produce unlimited supplies of peak performance immune cells, called T-cells. In tests, the engineered immune cells specifically destroyed leukaemia cells and ignored normal cells of the same type.

'That's the beauty of the approach,' said Dr Stauss. 'It is so specific at destroying cancer cells.' He hopes to further develop the technique for after-care to ensure there is no recurrence of the cantimescale is about five to six years before we see it widely used,' said Dr Stauss.

'The principle can be applied to almost all forms of leukaemia. What makes the work even more exciting is that our findings can also be applied to solid cancers, such as breast or lung cancer, where there is similar over-activity of WT-1.'

Lord Winston, director of research and development at the Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, said: 'To the best of our knowledge this is the first time in the world that anyone has identified a target which allows T-cells to selectively destroy cells that cause leukaemia.

'Such a breakthrough underlines the vital importance of long-term academic research in the production of new and desperately needed treatments.'

Every year 5,000 cases of leukaemia are diagnosed in Britain and 4,000 victims die. It can be either acute, with rapid degeneration, or chronic, a slowly progressive form of the disease.

In both cases the bone marrow of the patient produces large numbers of abnormal, fast- dividing cells which inhibit the body's ability to produce blood. Chemotherapy is the recognised treatment. Sometimes bone marrow transplants are needed.

Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz1WJYSnQMX



#2 random

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 06:58 AM

Mr. Trey,

Please



#3 valiantchong

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 08:12 AM

This article on immune system of utiliizing WT-1 LSC surface was not new, there are already trial but the results was not very convincing... otther trial as using multi peptides results also not very convincing. This article is too vague and did not metion what is the different techniq use and when is the trial taking place...



#4 Trey

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 10:59 AM

I was surprised to see that the article talked about this as "new".  I previously have discussed the WT-1 vaccine clinical trial that took place way back in 2006, and WT1 has been discussed as a leukemia vaccine target since at least 2003.



#5 random

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 11:42 AM

I took a search over the internet and indeed, nothing new - this article is from 10 years ago - from 2001.

Thank you for your efforts, and maybe we can close this.



#6 valiantchong

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 11:01 AM

Well, not just to cut off the WT-1 path to cure yet..

http://www.medsci.org/v07p0072.htm

1. Clinical efficacy of WT1 peptide vaccination

A 51 year-old male with CML in chronic phase had been treated with 400 mg imatinib for two and a half years. Although bcr-abl transcripts decreased transiently to less than 1,000 copies in 1 ?g RNA extracted from PB cells (3-log reduction = 280 copies in 1 ?g cellular RNA; median in our laboratory, n=120) during the imatinib treatment, the transcripts gradually increased to more than 4,000 copies spontaneously thereafter. Imatinib was increased to a dose of 600 mg and continued for 4 months, which caused adverse effects such as worsening of anemia and limb pain with increased CK. Therefore the dose of imatinib was decreased to 400 mg. Thereafter bcr-abl transcripts decreased transiently to 500 copies during the imatinib treatment, which was speculated to be the late effects of imatinib therapy at the dose of 600 mg a day. However, bcr-abl transcripts gradually increased to more than 1,000 copies thereafter. Since the patient was HLA-A*2402+ and informed consent was obtained, modified-type WT1 peptides, which had been identified to possess an anti-tumor immunogenicity [7], were administered subcutaneously at the dose of 1 mg every 2 weeks in combination with 400 mg imatinib. After the second administration of the peptides, WT1 peptide/HLA-A*2402 (WT1/MHC) tetramer+CD8+ T cells began to be detected in PB at a frequency of 7x10-6 in PB-CD8+ T cells. After the fourth administration of WT1 peptides, bcr-abl transcripts decreased to 820 copies with an increase in the frequency of WT1/MHC tetramer+CD8+ T cells in PB. However, bcr-abl transcripts increased to more than 1,000 copies after the eighth administration of WT1 peptides, though the frequencies of WT1/MHC tetramer+CD8+ T cells in PB were maintained at a considerable level. Since there was a report that some anti-tumor CD8+ CTLs lose their cytolytic activity by strong antigenic stimulation [9], the interval of WT1 peptide administration was changed from two weeks to four weeks after the eleventh administration of WT1 peptides. Although bcr-abl transcripts rose up to 2,600 copies after 12th administration of WT1 peptides, thereafter the transcripts tended to decrease and fell to 400 copies after 22nd administration of WT1 peptides. After seven months from the cessation of WT1 peptide vaccination bcr-abl transcripts decreased to the level of a major molecular response (170 copies). Four months thereafter, bcr-abl transcripts achieved to the level below detection by RQ/RT-PCR (complete molecular response) (Fig. 1). WT1/MHC tetramer+CD8+ CTLs are still present in the blood on 14th month post cessation of the peptides. No adverse effects due to WT1 peptide vaccination was observed except for skin induration and redness at the sites of WT1 peptide injection.



#7 valiantchong

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 11:19 AM

I believe this is the latest on similar vaccine trial.

"We have already demonstrated that this new type of DNA vaccine is safe and can successfully activate the immune systems in patients with cancer of the prostate, bowel and lung. We believe it will prove to be beneficial to patients with acute and chronic myeloid leukaemia."

Dr Katy Rezvani, clinical senior lecturer at Imperial College London and consultant haematologist at Imperial College Healthcare, says: "At Hammersmith Hospital we have been using targeted leukaemia drug therapies, like tyrosine kinase inhibitors, for over 10 years. While these drugs are the first line therapy for chronic myeloid leukaemia patients, they can rarely 'cure' the condition. This new vaccine has the potential to improve the outcome of leukaemia treatments and could serve as a method of managing solid tumours."

Professor Freda Stevenson, an immunologist at the University of Southampton who is also working on the study, adds: "I'm very pleased with the results from the laboratory research, and am optimistic the vaccine will be successful in making a real difference to patients with myeloid leukaemia."

In the study, each participant will receive six doses of DNA vaccine over a six month period, with further booster vaccinations if successful. The vaccine will be administered in a groundbreaking new way, using electroporation, in which controlled, rapid electrical pulses create permeability in cell membranes and enable increased uptake of biological material after its injection into muscle or skin tissue. The electroporation system was developed by the US pharmaceutical company Inovio.

Inovio's CEO Dr J Joseph Kim, says: "This study expands Inovio's long-standing relationship with the University of Southampton into an important disease area. We are proud that Inovio will make a significant contribution to this Phase II trial for these cancers with clear unmet medical needs."

The DNA vaccine was developed at the University with funding from Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research and Cancer Research UK.

Dr David Grant, Scientific Director of Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research, adds: "We are delighted to see this trial in leukaemia go ahead. It is an important step for us to see the laboratory work on DNA vaccines that the charity has supported take the next logical step into clinical testing. The trial has undergone extensive international peer review and we are very excited to see the first patients being treated. We believe that this vaccine has real promise to improve outcomes in patients with leukaemia."

The success of the vaccines will be measured over a two year survival period for acute myeloid leukaemia and by assessing the immune system's response to the drug using a disease marker (BCR-ABL) for chronic myeloid leukaemia.

Leukaemia is a malignant disease of the bone marrow and blood characterised by the uncontrolled accumulation of blood cells. Leukaemia accounts for 220,000 deaths worldwide each year.

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid line in blood cells and is characterised by rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a type of cancer that causes the body to produce large numbers of immature and mature white blood cells.

Ref: www.scientistlive.com



#8 Tedsey

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 12:25 PM

I wish they would stop reporting these things until there is significant support for it working.  Nice dream.  But working in a dish is not the same as in a body.  One human subject.  Hmmmmm. 



#9 Tedsey

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 12:34 PM

This drives me crazy too!!!!

"Every year 5,000 cases of leukaemia are diagnosed in Britain and 4,000 victims die. It can be either acute, with rapid degeneration, or chronic, a slowly progressive form of the disease."

How is that to misrepresent meaning and mislead the public, scare patients, etc., etc.?  Why do journalists do this????  Maybe they just don't get it--like most people.

It is highly unlikely that the chronic folks die within 1 year of diagnosis.  People can live for years with leukemia, acute and chronic. 

Sorry, I must be in a bad mood.  But I just had to clarify.  The Brits don't have it any worse than anyone else.  But I guess if you are fighting to make something seem dire (which it really is), you would want to empahsize a bit.  It may work to get funding, but I would hate for the more vulnerable to misunderstand.



#10 GerryL

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 07:14 PM

Hi Tedsey,

Never let the truth get in the way of a good story.






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